Using information appropriately

Let’s face it. We’re all overloaded with information. It’s not that we don’t get enough, it’s that we lose the ability to filter effectively. Organisations are exactly the same. Without proper filtering, it’s easy to see why common sense goes out the window.

Seeing as it’s the customers that produce an organisation’s revenue and profits and the business users who could sabotage a transformation programme. Might it not be useful to minimise the uncertainty when it comes to customer or user attitudes to change?

Just the same way as it’s critical to drive organisations with the right information, the same applies to the people in it. After all, accurate information is a big part of human motivation. And in my experience, the key here is relevant, timely, and accurate information. But not too much if you want to cut through.

While data is the hard facts and information has had a level of interpretation applied to it, knowledge is an even deeper kind of awareness. When used together, they create a powerful and persuasive mix when it comes to decision making. That’s for companies,  customers and employees alike. As a consultant, giving a CIO the right information about why their critical finance system is falling over during a cutover may well be the difference between working on more projects with the company or not. Likewise, giving an employee the right information about why their role is merging with another may well be the difference between that employee staying, and thriving, or leaving after becoming demoralised and posting a negative review on Glassdoor.com.

After all, what is strategy if not a sense and response relationship to data and the way people respond to it?

Thankfully, having accurate information about the status of projects, resistance from business users, and other technology metrics makes all the difference. And you can see why information and more importantly, the right response to it, is vital for successful projects, thriving business, and happy customers.

 

 

 

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